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What are the Common Law Marriage States

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What are Common Law Marriage States?As of March 2011 within the United States, there exist sixteen states that recognize a common law marriage as a legal and recognizable matrimonial institution; this recognition of common law marriage does not carry over to other States that do not recognize common law marriages. The following 11 States enact Common Law Marriage:AlabamaColoradoWashington DCIowaKansasMontanaOklahomaRhode IslandSouth CarolinaTexasUtahWithin the following 5 States that do not enact the process of common law marriage, supplementary stipulations specific to each State’s legislation exist:GeorgiaThe common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed prior to January 1st, 1997 IdahoThe common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed prior to January 1st, 1996 New HampshireThe common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed for inheritance purposesOhioThe common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed prior to October 10th, 1991PennsylvaniaThe common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed before January 1st, 2005 What is Common Law Marriage?A Common law marriage is classified as a legal matrimony processes that allows for a couple who maintains romantic involvement to be considered legally wed; as in the case of a common law marriage, couples eligible to wed under the precepts of Common Law are not required to participate in a wedding ceremonies; furthermore, these couples are not required to obtain marriage certificates. What is Common Law?Common Law is considered to rely more heavily – if not completely – on the legal statutes and stipulations inherent to Case Law, which is a legal field within which past sentencing and review are employed as legal guidelines for sentencing; typically, the rulings enacted in the past will serve as guidelines with regard to future rulings.What is the ‘Full Faith and Credit Clause’?The ‘Full Faith and Credit Clause’ existing within the Constitution of the United States – in Article IV, Section 1 – mandates the requirement of individual States to recognize legal finding rendered by other State judiciaries, individual States are not required to recognize a Common Law Marriage as a legal institution regardless of whether or not they were enacted within Common Law Marriage States. Guidelines of Common Law Marriage StatesCouples eligible for Common Law Marriage – within Common Law Marriage States – are required to present themselves as a married couple both in conduct, as well as lifestyle; this includes behaving in a manner that is indicative of marriage permanent and longstanding in nature. Furthermore, couples eligible for Common Law Marriage within Common Law Marriage States are required to share a residence for a substantial period of time while undergoing a lifestyle illustrative of cohabitation; this will include a requirement to claim one another as a spouse on all applicable documents, applications, and forms.
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  • Common Law Marriage

    What are Common Law Marriage States?


    As of March 2011 within the United States, there exist sixteen states that recognize a common law marriage as a legal and recognizable matrimonial institution; this recognition of common law marriage does not carry over to other States that do not recognize common law marriages.
    The following 11 States enact Common Law Marriage:

    Alabama
    Colorado
    Washington DC
    Iowa
    Kansas
    Montana
    Oklahoma
    Rhode Island
    South Carolina
    Texas
    Utah

    Within the following 5 States that do not enact the process of common law marriage, supplementary stipulations specific to each State’s legislation exist:

    Georgia

    The common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed prior to January 1st, 1997

    Idaho

    The common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed prior to January 1st, 1996

    New Hampshire

    The common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed for inheritance purposes

    Ohio

    The common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed prior to October 10th, 1991

    Pennsylvania

    The common law marriage is recognized in the event that it was filed before January 1st, 2005

    What is Common Law Marriage?


    A Common law marriage is classified as a legal matrimony processes that allows for a couple who maintains romantic involvement to be considered legally wed; as in the case of a common law marriage, couples eligible to wed under the precepts of Common Law are not required to participate in a wedding ceremonies; furthermore, these couples are not required to obtain marriage certificates.

    What is Common Law?

    Common Law is considered to rely more heavily – if not completely – on the legal statutes and stipulations inherent to Case Law, which is a legal field within which past sentencing and review are employed as legal guidelines for sentencing; typically, the rulings enacted in the past will serve as guidelines with regard to future rulings.

    What is the ‘Full Faith and Credit Clause’?

    The ‘Full Faith and Credit Clause’ existing within the Constitution of the United States – in Article IV, Section 1 – mandates the requirement of individual States to recognize legal finding rendered by other State judiciaries, individual States are not required to recognize a Common Law Marriage as a legal institution regardless of whether or not they were enacted within Common Law Marriage States.

    Guidelines of Common Law Marriage States

    Couples eligible for Common Law Marriage – within Common Law Marriage States – are required to present themselves as a married couple both in conduct, as well as lifestyle; this includes behaving in a manner that is indicative of marriage permanent and longstanding in nature. Furthermore, couples eligible for Common Law Marriage within Common Law Marriage States are required to share a residence for a substantial period of time while undergoing a lifestyle illustrative of cohabitation; this will include a requirement to claim one another as a spouse on all applicable documents, applications, and forms.

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